Common Mistakes to Avoid With Electric Fencing

Most people think setting up an electric fence is just as easy as setting up non-electric fences. They do not take into account the sensitivity of the charges associated with electric fencing. Because of this, there are several common mistake people make when setting up their electric fences that render them useless. Below are some common mistakes and ways to avoid them.

Setting up posts too closely
The average fence has posts set up every 50 feet for large fences and even closer for smaller areas. Because of this, people will also set their fence posts this closely. However, because of the tautness of the fence, if an animal tries to break through, they usually damage the fence and uproot the posts. The posts should be spread further apart to allow some give in the fence. This way, if an animal tries to break through, the fence will give some without breaking or uprooting the posts. Since the fence gives instead of breaking, it allows the animal to feel the full force of the electric shock guaranteeing that the animal will think twice before charging the fence again.

Not Accounting for wet weather conditions
It is no shock (excuse the pun) that fences are affected by wet conditions. What is a surprise is that wet grass lying on the fence can absorb the charge from the fence rendering it useless. To avoid this common mistake, keep grass around the fence cut short. Otherwise, if you cannot cut the grass on a regular basis, wire the bottom of the fence separately from the top and install a separate switch. That way, when the grass is high, you can turn off the switch for the lower part of the fence and keep the charge on the upper portion.

Not Enough Voltage
The purpose of an electric fence is to deliver a shock to an animal to keep it in, or out, of the fence. Some people think they have purchased faulty fencing when animals escape because they were not deterred by the shock. However, the lack of shock may be attributed to the setup of the fence as opposed to the fence itself. To avoid this mistake, make sure you install a strong charger. Also, if you do not have a voltmeter, get one. This is the only way for you to know if the shock is strong enough. If all else fails, check the size of your wires. The bigger your wires, the more electricity they carry.

An electric fence is a worthwhile buy if you need to keep animals in your yard. Just make sure you avoid these mistakes when setting up your fence, good luck.